• 0

It doesn’t matter if you call them carpenter bees, wood bees or whatever, if you have structures, including decks, around your property that have unpainted and untreated wood, you will have these bumblebee look alikes hanging around your property at least part of the summer. Even though they…

  • Updated
  • 0

The Geary County Historical Society is open by appointment, so be sure to call if you are interested in touring the museum, have a potential donation, or research questions! We sure do appreciate you wearing a mask and we have ours on as well.

  • Updated
  • 0

As you can imagine, my job allows me to look at a lot of plant growth issues either from plants brought into my office or onsite in yards, gardens, fields or pastures. There are many things that will cause plants to not grow normally. Some of these issues are caused by insects or diseases, b…

  • Updated
  • 0

The internet is potentially an amazing resource. So many information portals. Literally a vast amount of the knowledge of the world lies at your fingertips for amazingly rapid retrieval. The internet has allowed us to stay sane during the quarantine. It allows us to step into the cartoon wor…

  • 0

I was about town last week looking at a diseased tree when I heard a couple of adult cardinals just having a fit. I turned around and saw a young cardinal that had obviously done an early launch out of the nest that was probably about 2 or 3 days away from being able to really fly well. It w…

  • 0

Some days I read something in the news and I just shake my head and quietly hope it goes away quickly. That was the case several weeks ago when I saw the headlines flashing “Murder Hornets...” I felt like Charlie Brown in every TV special. “Oh good grief!” Let’s just set the record straight.…

  • 0

Under the state's Phase 1.5 guidelines, Geary County Historical Society is still not permitted to open to the public. Until it is safe to reopen, museum staff are working hard to come up with fun activities you can do at home or outdoors to learn more about Geary County history.

  • 0

Last week started off with several rounds of intense thunderstorms moving through the area. Thunderstorms this time of year can cause major damage to plants, or virtually no damage. By their very nature thunderstorms will have lightning, wind, rain, and sometimes hail. We experienced all fou…

  • 0

On October 10, two reports appeared on the front page of the Junction City Union providing a correction to rumors apparently circulating about town. “Town Is Not Quarantined,” headlines declared; “People May Enter or Leave Junction City as Usual.” The tone of the article suggests the authors…

  • 0

Many serious gardeners have had seeds in the ground for over a month. But for a lot of people the gardening season doesn´t really start until they can plant their tomatoes. More on that later, but we are just barely on the cusp of tomato planting time.

  • 0

There are many parallels to see when looking at the past for lessons from the 1918 influenza epidemic. While scanning schoolbooks for a digital exhibit recently, I came across a passage in a 1915 junior high science textbook that reminded me of one profound difference between 1918 and today:…

  • 0

In the current era of stay at home orders, only go out for essential services, avoid crowds, etc. many homeowners are in a quandary, given they have more time around home, of what they should or shouldn´t be doing for their lawns. “Do I go to the hardware store to buy fertilizer, crabgrass c…

  • 0

Before the influenza epidemic began, 1918 was already a time of uncertainty and disruption for Americans. The United States' entry in World War I in April 1917 meant Americans had already accepted dramatic changes to their daily lives. The nation's economy turned to wartime production and mi…

  • 0

I see a lot of yards around town, including my own, that has a lot of really

  • 0

With the knowledge that we are living through historic events, staff at Geary County Historical Society have recorded some of their day-to-day observations for a “coronavirus diary” project.

  • 0

With the knowledge that we are living through historic events, staff at Geary County Historical Society have recorded some of their day-to-day observations for a “coronavirus diary” project.

  • 0

About this time of year I start to receive phone calls of birds attacking windows. This is different than birds flying into windows. We see that all winter long. Birds are startled and don´t realize that the reflection of the outdoors in the window is not really a continuation of outdoors. T…

  • 0

Geary County’s death records dating from 1917 and 1918 are now available online on our website at http://www.gchsweb.org/p/spanish-flu.html. I am asking the public for assistance with transcribing these records, and I have started the process on an online spreadsheet.

  • 0

We will be saying farewell to our flood exhibit SubMerged on May 1! Stop in over the next month if you haven’t had a chance to see this exhibit, which explores the history of floods in Geary County and how all of the floods led to the creation of Milford Dam. Following a 2017 Memories at the…

  • 0

Kansas, specifically Kansas weather, does not like evergreen trees. Or to put it more correctly, most evergreen trees don’t like Kansas weather/climate. When we talk about evergreen trees we are talking about pine, spruce, fir, arborvitae and cedar (junipers). To put it in perspective, Kansa…

  • 0

I find strange ways to pass the time. I read the ads in Sunday papers looking for those outrageous claims of the latest amazing fast growing tree, or the instant deep green lawn grass, or the new miracle way to grow tomatoes. I spend time looking for these products in self defense because so…

Latest e-Edition

Calendar